Pumpkin Online Aims to Include Everyone, Everywhere | Indie Game Magazine

a-spoon-is-born:

shwetanarayan:

zeekubeast:

wigglyflippingout:

ladynorbert:

Okay, Tumblr, let’s make this go viral. You all know that representation in the media is desperately needed, and this game is delivering what many of the big-name games haven’t. Pumpkin Online is made by a development team headed by an African-American woman and they’re aiming to make this game as inclusive and friendly as possible. This is a farming/romance sim mixed up with an adventure MMORPG and made incredibly diverse.

You want to play a non-binary character? You got it! You want a range of races in your NPC neighbors? Done! Clothing choices and body features not restricted by gender? It’s in there! Relationships in no way affected by gender or lack of gender? Yes, that too!

Let’s get this thing going viral and help promote the Kickstarter (link in the article) so that everyone gets the chance to play the character they want to play. Reblog buttons, do your thing!

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO YOU GUYYYYSSSSSSSSSSSS

reblogging this again with a link to their Kickstarter here

I WANT THIS SO MUCH

This looks pretty cool:

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yeahhhhh

(via butdiversityisunrealistic)

The monsters in your head
are frightening for the very same reason
everyone believes they should not be,
they aren’t real,
because day in and day out
you must live with the knowledge
that your own mind is working against you,
whispering dark things in the middle of the night,
disobeying your desperate cries to stop,
your own mind is a murderous adversary,
an enemy under your own skin,
and nothing is quite so terrifying.
Beau Taplin || The monsters in your head.  (via afadthatlastsforever)

nearlya:

Amie DickeAfter Goldschmidt, 2012

"At the Herengracht 401 there is a room on the third floor. This room used to be a hiding place for young (Jewish) men during World War II. Manuel Goldschmidt was one of them and after the liberation he stayed connected to this safe house. Until recently he lived in the same room where he was kept in hiding. He died in March 2012.

When I first entered the space it felt like a time capsule. A frozen world that you do not want to touch because of its delicate state, yet too important to let it go. In an attempt to mark the fragile points I began to fill up the cracks and open joints with pieces of gold colored emergency blankets. 

I started with the windows (there was quite some draft). Then I lined the contours of the space between the outside wall and the carpet, like a floor plan, followed by the cracks in the furniture pieces and little holes in the walls and ceiling. It took me almost a month to make this fragmented drawing in space.”

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

volatilevibes:

Okay so, where I live (Canada, Newfoundland) we have the smallest ponies.
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And the biggest dogs
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Here’s a size comparison for the Newfoundland dog 
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and together
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That is a full grown dog and pony together LOOK AT THAT!
Now if you don’t think that’s the greatest shit ever I don’t know what is!

(via terraismight)

Iranian transgender refugee struggles for acceptance

sallymolay:

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Read the whole story!

See also this story on a survey of LGBT students in Iran.

(via gole-yakh)

I wish people could just say how they feel like ‘Hey I really don’t like when you do that to me’ or ‘Hey I’m in love with you’ or ‘Hi I really miss you and I think about you all the time’ without sounding desperate. Why can’t everyone be painfully honest and just save people the trouble.

Unknown (via perfect)

It starts with yourself

(via bohemianist)

(Source: ridiculouslyproper, via cyanine)

Meghan: I’ve noticed that in the U.S. in particular, some of those who might identify as “sex worker rights advocates” will criticize abolitionists for conflating trafficking and prostitution. I wonder if you can talk a bit about that – are prostitution and trafficking connected? Is there a difference between the two?

Kajsa: Basically trafficking is the answer to the question of demand and supply and the problem of supply. Trafficking comes in when there isn’t a large enough supply of prostitutes for the demand that exists — if you’re talking in market terms. In the Western world there are never enough women who enter the sex industry voluntarily — there’s always a shortage, to put it that way. The people who do enter the trade are worn out pretty fast and the clients always want “fresh meat” to put it crudely. They want younger women and women who’ve just started. They don’t want the old prostitutes who’ve been in prostitution for fifty years.

On top of that, the high mortality rate and the way it wears on your body makes life in prostitution pretty short. So there’s always demand for more and more people in prostitution. If there were women coming by the millions to the sex industry you wouldn’t need to drag them out of Eastern Europe. I mean, why would you do that? It’s not logical. If there were thousands of women lining up outside brothels saying “Please, let me in to work!” why would the mafia need to drag them across Europe or across the world — there’d be no point. Trafficking exists because there simply aren’t enough women who will go into prostitution willingly. If you want a prostitution industry without trafficking it would have to be a very small industry.

You can’t separate prostitution from trafficking. You would have to decrease demand to such an extent that very few men were actually buying sex. Then you could perhaps be certain that women were there “voluntarily.”

Meghan: I wonder if you could talk a little bit more about the Swedish model or the “Nordic model,” as it’s sometimes called, and what that entails.

Kajsa: What a lot of people don’t know is that this model is the result of thirty years of work and research. People think it’s just a bunch of feminists and social workers who decided to wage a war against men or something. No — they started doing research back in the 1970s and looking into the reality of prostitution. This was the first time anyone interviewed people in prostitution on a large scale. The focus was shifting from prostitution being a case of deviance and instead were starting to understand this as a huge social tragedy involving gendered social relationships, poverty, the way women are raised, incest, etc.

After this research was done, the question of what to do came. The answer they came up with was to criminalize the client and legislation went into effect in 1999. It’s been 14 years since then and you can no longer even attempt to pay for sexual services. The law has been very successful not only in that demand has decreased but in that the majority of the population now understands prostitution as a product of gender inequality. Eighty percent of the Swedish population supports the law, which you don’t hear about very much.

What happened then was that traffickers started finding it difficult to establish in Sweden and moved to Norway. Oslo, the capital of Norway, became flooded with Nigerian mafia and all these Norwegian men started paying for sex, which led Norway to adopt the same law. The traffickers proceeded to move to Denmark, which is why Denmark is currently considering adopting the same law.

Meghan: Do exiting services and other supports for people who want to leave the industry exist? What happens to women who lose their income when they leave prostitution?

Kajsa: That’s something I want to stress — if you want to adopt a law like this you can’t just implement it and then do nothing. You have to ensure the law is accompanied by appropriate support services. In Sweden we have something called the prostitution units and they aren’t just exiting programs — they are much more. If you have been in the industry you have access to free therapy, help finding housing and employment, and dealing with things like debt, for example.